Banishing Shame

There is a strong, direct relationship between low self-esteem and shame. Today, let’s explore this relationship.

We all experience shame from time to time, that horrible sinking feeling that strikes at the very center of our being and launches a fundamental assault on our self-esteem.

Shame truly does have a damaging effect on the development of healthy self-esteem. Perhaps the most important step we can take to rid the world of this malignant emotion is to avoid raising another generation of shame-based people.

Psychologist Susan Miller once wrote in the Atlantic Monthly, “A child’s experience of being someone who counts, comes in large part from the parents’ capacity to empathetically tune into that child.”

That means allowing children to feel what they feel and responding to them in a reasonable way. For parents, it means getting rid of perfectionism, blame, and attempts at constant control. And it means understanding that children have a right to their own thoughts, perceptions and feelings, and a right to make their own choices, within reason, even when they are different from ours.

If we want to raise healthy children who are free from unhealthy shame, the need to feel free to be themselves, without fear, is vital. Children need parents and grandparents who love them and appreciate them just the way they are, while setting reasonable limits and keeping them safe from harm.